Critics Divided Over Duchess Of Cambridge Portrait - ABC 8NEWS - WRIC | Richmond, Virginia News & Weather

Critics Divided Over Duchess Of Cambridge Portrait

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Members of the media talk to artist Paul Emsley, center right, in front of his newly-commissioned portrait of Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, on display at the National Portrait Gallery in London, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. (AP Photo/Sang Tan) Members of the media talk to artist Paul Emsley, center right, in front of his newly-commissioned portrait of Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, on display at the National Portrait Gallery in London, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)
A newly-commissioned portrait of Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, by artist Paul Emsley hangs at the National Portrait Gallery in London, Jan. 11, 2013. While the painting reveals a more mature Middleton, art critics say it looks nothing like her. (Sang Tan/AP A newly-commissioned portrait of Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, by artist Paul Emsley hangs at the National Portrait Gallery in London, Jan. 11, 2013. While the painting reveals a more mature Middleton, art critics say it looks nothing like her. (Sang Tan/AP

LONDON (AP) -- The Duchess of Cambridge seems to like her first official portrait, which is lucky for the artist, since not all the critics agree.

Paul Emsley's portrait of the former Kate Middleton shows the 31-year-old royal against a dark background, her lips pursed into a wry smile, with an ethereal light against her face and hair. Her pale complexion brings out the fine lines under the eyes, and the light adds a hint of silver to her rich brown hair.

Shortly after the portrait was unveiled Friday at the National Portrait Gallery in London, critics began grousing.

"I'm really sad to say this is a rotten portrait," Daily Mail art critic Robin Simon said.

Guardian arts writer Charlotte Higgins said that Kate's mouth looked clenched, her eyes looked dead, and that the whole thing had "sepulchral gloom" about it.

"Kate Middleton is - whatever you think of the monarchy and all its inane surrounding pomp - a pretty young woman with an infectious smile, a cascade of chestnut hair and a healthy bloom," she wrote in a post to her newspaper's website. "So how is it that she has been transformed into something unpleasant from the `Twilight' franchise?"

Emsley told reporters at the opening that it was always going to be tough painting Kate, who sat for the portrait last year, before she became pregnant.

"A person whose image is so pervasive, for an artist it is really difficult to go beyond that and find something which is original," he said. "You have to rely on your technique and your artistic instincts to do that and I hope I've succeeded."

Royal portraits tend to veer between the staid and the controversial. Lucian Freud's 2001 portrait of Queen Elizabeth II remains a particularly notorious example, with some describing the heavy, severe painting of the monarch as deeply unflattering and others calling it groundbreaking.

In fairness to Emsley, some artists had praise for his work.

"I liked it, very much so," said Richard Stone, who has frequently painted members of the royal family. "So often with official portraits they can be rather stiff and starchy, but this has a lovely informality about it, and a warmth to it."

In any case, Emsley appeared to have won over his most important audience. Kate, who was with her husband, Prince William, at the gallery earlier Friday, called the portrait "just amazing." William liked it too, saying it was "absolutely beautiful."

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