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Richmonders Remember Boston Marathon Bombing

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Last year's Boston marathon was Weldon Chafe's third Boston Marathon. Last year's Boston marathon was Weldon Chafe's third Boston Marathon.
ABC 8News Producer Matt Josselyn was covering the marathon as part of his journalism program at Emerson College. He had friends running and was at the finish line when he saw and heard the explosions. ABC 8News Producer Matt Josselyn was covering the marathon as part of his journalism program at Emerson College. He had friends running and was at the finish line when he saw and heard the explosions.
Meg Menzies, the jogger that was killed earlier this year in Hanover by an alleged drunk driver, was training for the Boston Marathon. Her husband will be running this year. Meg Menzies, the jogger that was killed earlier this year in Hanover by an alleged drunk driver, was training for the Boston Marathon. Her husband will be running this year.
RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) - Many Richmond runners were running in the Boston Marathon last year when the bombs went off. Some local people were right there at the finish line the moment the first bomb exploded.
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Last year's Boston marathon was Weldon Chafe's third Boston Marathon. As he approached the finish line, he slowed to high-five the hands of children who had lined up to cheer on the runners.

58 seconds later, Chafe watched as some of those same children were severely injured when the first bomb went off.

"I looked over my shoulder when I heard the bomb and you could see the smoke," he says.

Chafe, a practicing doctor, immediately turned around and attempted to assist the injured.

"It was a little unnerving needless to say just to see runners down. The first responders and policemen closed everything down immediately."

Chafe says his family had been tracking him throughout the marathon online. They knew he was near the finish line when the bombs went off, but it was hours before they would know Chafe was all right.

"Impossible to make contact," he says. "All the cell phone systems got shut down for pretty close to about two hours, so communicating with outside people, family, and friends was impossible for about a couple of hours."

Chafe says he'll never forget the moment he was finally able to talk with his family.

"It was touching, easiest way to describe it."

That was Chafe's third Boston Marathon. He planned for it to also be his last.

"I had thought that was probably going to be my last one," he says. "It was my third one, but after that I was more than determined to be there again this year."

So in true Boston Strong fashion, Chafe will lace up one more time, determined to run another 26.2 miles, but this time for young Martin Richard, Krystle Campbell and Lu Lingzi, the three killed last year.
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ABC 8News Producer Matt Josselyn spends his days writing and producing what you see on the air.

But a year ago, he saw and heard the bombs go off at the Boston Marathon.

"Even now it seems like it was yesterday," he says. "I was probably a little over 100 yards from the second bomb when it went off."

Josselyn was covering the marathon as part of his journalism program at Emerson College. He had friends running and was at the finish line when he saw and heard the explosions.

"The thing I remember most probably is the shockwave," he says. "A lot of people say they remember the sound and the sound was very loud but you could definitely feel the wave of energy pass over you."

That wave of energy - followed by panic and terror - is something Josselyn will never forget as cheering turned to screaming.

"I remember going in and standing in the street for about 30 seconds or so waiting for the next bomb to go off," he says. "You had no idea… one goes off… two go off… you're sitting there waiting and waiting and waiting for the next one to go off."

After waiting a minute or so, Josselyn ran to the area where the bombs had gone off. He wanted to help but trained medical personnel had already arrived.

From there, he waited several terrifying days until investigators found who they say was behind the act.

One year later, Josselyn has had time to reflect on that day and how Boston - and the world - has changed.

"I'm just proud of the way the city's responded and how they're stepping up and saying these tragic events may have unfolded," he says. "You may have tried to strike terror in the hearts of the people that live in the city but we're not terrorized. We're strong."
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Also headed to Boston this year is Scott Menzies, the husband of Meg Menzies, the jogger that was killed earlier this year in Hanover by an alleged drunk driver. Menzies was training for the Boston Marathon.

Meg's mother, Pam Cross, spoke to us about what the Boston Marathon ment to Meg.

"It meant so much to Meg," she says. "To be a part of it and to be able to run the marathon. That is what she was training for and looking forward to being there. She had run it in 2012 and she wanted to do better this time."


Copyright 2014 by Young Broadcasting of Richmond

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