RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — One local artist said that after he saw an increase in social injustice, he began to use his passion for public art to bring people together, and foster difficult conversations in his community.

Public artist Hamilton Glass created the healing art project, Mending Walls, in 2020 after protests over the killing of George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter movement. He said he saw the project as an opportunity to create deep and authentic conversations about race, social justice, and equity throughout Richmond.

“We really tried to stick with a process that allows people to collaborate with an authentic through an authentic conversation,” Glass said.

By finding a creative way to host these conversations, Glass quickly realized that there was more opportunity for these same conversations to happen outside the city of Richmond.

Public artist Hamilton Glass created the healing art project, Mending Walls, in 2020 after protests over the killing of George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter movement. He said he saw the project as an opportunity to create deep and authentic conversations about race, social justice, and equity throughout Richmond. (Photo: Rolynn Wilson/8News)

“Mending Walls has not just changed Richmond, it has changed other states. And people have been reaching out all over the country to talk about the work and trying to find other creative means, even beyond murals,” Glass said.

As a part of the project, he collaborated with 30 artists from different cultural backgrounds to create 16 murals spread out across the city of Richmond. Each mural represents the issue and experiences of race and status.

This experience was documented in his 2021 documentary titled ‘Mending Walls: The Documentary.’ Throughout the entirety of the film, artists are shown getting to know one another and describe how working together allowed them to have difficult conversations over a multitude of topics. The artists involved in this project see this as an opportunity to spread a message and a symbol of hope for the community.

As a part of Mending Walls 2022, the project is collaborating with five artists, Richmond Hill and community partners to create ‘Transcending Walls’. The artists involved are Nadd Harvin, Hope Morgan, Lizzie Brown, Rian L. Moses and Sam Skrimpz.

“So acknowledging that we see and hear you, acknowledging that we want to move forward, that there is work to be done, but that change is happening and through this mural, this is a part of the process,” said Lizzie Brown a public artist in the Mending Walls project.

The community can be involved in the project to create a mural on a 500-foot wall at Richmond Hill. Anyone eight years old or older is welcome to help volunteer. The mural painting is scheduled for July 22 and 23.