Richmond Jewish Food Festival returns for first time in two years

Richmond

(Photo Credit to Rich Goldberg with Richmond Jewish Food Festival)

RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — Rich Goldberg and his wife have been with the Richmond Jewish Food Festival since day one.

He attributes the evolution of the festival to his wife, Diane.

“It was my wife’s idea to resurrect it from a previous incarnation,” Goldberg explained.

Goldberg said that the food festival originated at his synagogue, Keneseth Beth Israel, where it was put on annually for six years before the popularity of the festival outgrew the space available at the site.

“We just kept growing and growing until we outgrew the synagogue,” Goldberg described. “We decided to make it at a more appropriate location… this way we could consider it more of a Jewish community event.”

The Richmond Jewish Food Festival now resides at The Weinstein Jewish Community Center, 5403 Monument Ave.

After its first year at the community center, the festival fully filled that space as well. Goldberg said that, in the inside of the center, there is a large auditorium where people would take their food to eat after ordering. They also had to set up heated tents around the outside of the community center to accommodate the amount of people attending.

“It’s 6,000-square-feet of tent space just for serving food,” he stated.

On average, over the two days of the festival, Goldberg said that around 10,000 people come by to take part and sample the array of foods offered.

After a hiatus in 2020, this year, Goldberg said the festival will look a little different:

  • In order to keep both attendees and volunteers safe, this year the 14th Annual Jewish Food Festival will be a one-day take home, “Heat n’ Eat” style event.
  • Guests are asked to order their food in advance off of a set menu online. They will then pick up their pre-cooked food at the Weinstein Jewish Community Center on Sunday, Jan. 16 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. No cash will be accepted.
  • Many regular menu items of the past will not be available due to cooking restraints, but fan favorites such as beef brisket, knish and stuffed cabbage will remain on this year’s menu.

“There are some restaurants around town that might serve some of these things, but these are authentic things and they are cooked by normal people,” Goldberg explained. “We don’t have any chefs on-hand or anything like that, its just the kinds of food that we would eat on our Sabbath, on our holidays, cooked by the people who do this normally for their family.”

Copyright 2022 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trending Stories

More Trending Stories

Local Events