MIAMI (WRIC) — The Department of Justice (DOJ) announced today that six people involved with involvement in four cryptocurrency-related, including the largest known Non-Fungible Token scheme, have been charged.

The DOJ said the cases involved cryptocurrency-related fraud, a fraudulent investment fund that traded on cryptocurrency exchanges, a global Ponzi scheme involving selling unregistered crypto securities and a fraudulent initial coin offering.

The four charges announced were:

Crypto NFT Scheme: United States v. Le Ahn Tuan

Tuan, 26-year-old Vietnamese national, was charged with one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and one count of conspiracy to commit international money laundering in the Central District of California, according to the department.

He was involved in the “Baller Ape Club,” an NFT investment project that sold NFTs in the form of cartoon figures, often in an ape figure. The DOJ said that after the NFT’s were sold, Tuan and his con-conspirators ended the investment project, deleted its website and stole the investors’ money. This is known as a “rug pull.”

Tuan and his co-conspirators would then launder the funds through “chain-hopping,” which is when one type of coin is changed into another one and the money is transferred across multiple cryptocurrency blockchains. The DOJ said they used swap services to hide the trail of the investors’ stolen money.

According to the department, Tuan and his co-conspirators received about $2.6 million from investors. If convicted on all counts, Tuan could face a maximum of 40 years in prison.

Crypto Ponzi and Unregistered Securities Scheme: United States v. Emerson Pires, Flavio Goncalves and Joshua David Nicolas

Pires, 33, Goncalves, 33, both from Brazil, and Nicholas, 28, from Florida, were each charged with one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and one count of conspiracy to commit securities fraud in the Southern District of Florida, according to the DOJ. Pires and Goncalves were also charged with conspiracy to commit international money laundering.

The department said the three are being charged in connection to a global cryptocurrency-based Ponzi scheme that generated them about $100 million from investors. Allegedly, Pires and Goncalves were the founders of EmpiresX and Nicholas was the “Head Trader.”

They promoted the cryptocurrency investment platform, which offered unregistered securities by creating falsifications about a trading bot and promising returns to investors and possible EmpiresX investors. The DOJ said they then laundered the money through a foreign cryptocurrency exchange and conducting a Ponzi scheme by paying earlier investors with the money received from later investors.

According to the DOJ, Pires and Goncalves face up to 45 years in prison and Nicholas faces up to 25 if convicted on all counts.

Crypto Initial Coin Offering Scheme: United States v. Michael Alan Stollery

Stollery, a 45-year-old from California, was the founder and CEO of Titanium Blockchain Infrastructure Services, a cryptocurrency investment platform. He was charged with one count of securities fraud in the Central District of California.

The DOJ said he received about $21 million from investors both in the U.S. and internationally by forging documents for possible investors, placing fake testimonials on the platform’s website and falsifying business relations with the U.S. Federal Reserve Board along with dozens of companies including, Apple Inc., The Walt Disney Company and Pfizer Inc.

According to the DOJ, Stollery faces a maximum of 20 years in prison if convicted on all counts.

Crypto Commodities Scheme: United States v. David Saffron

Saffron, a 49-year-old from Nevada, was the owner of Circle Society, a cryptocurrency investment platform. He was charged in the Central District of California with one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, four counts of wire fraud, one count of conspiracy to commit commodities fraud and one count of obstruction of justice.

The department said Saffron used the platform to ask investors to take part in an unregistered commodity pool, which combined investors’ money contributions to trade on the futures and commodity markets. He conveyed to investors that he had traded their funds to earn money using an investor bot that could carry out over 17,000 transactions per hour on various exchanges.

He told investors that this would produce between 500% to 600% returns. To attract investors, Saffron held investor meetings in luxury homes, including in the Hollywood Hills, and traveled with fake security guards to convey the fake indication that he was wealthy, according to the DOJ.

He received about $12 million from investors. According to the DOJ, if convicted on all counts, Saffron faces a maximum of 115 years in prison.