Navy confirms US fighter jet pilot killed in Death Valley crash that injured 7 visitors

U.S. & World

FILE – In this Feb. 27, 2017 file photo, an F/A-18D Hornet from the VX-9 Vampire squadron at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, flies out of what is known as Star Wars Canyon toward the Panamint range in Death Valley National Park, Calif. On Wednesday, July 31, 2019 a U.S. Navy F/A-18 Super Hornet jet crashed Wednesday in the California desert and a search-and-rescue operation was underway, officials said. The single-seat warplane went down at 9:50 a.m. during a routine training mission north of the China Lake base. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP/WRIC) — The U.S. Navy confirmed the death of a pilot Thursday who crashed a fighter jet in Death Valley National Park the day before. The crash injured seven people who were at a scenic overlook where aviation enthusiasts routinely watch military pilots speeding low through a chasm dubbed Star Wars Canyon, officials said.

A search was underway for the pilot of the single-seat F/A-18 Super Hornet that was on a routine training mission, Lt. Cmdr. Lydia Bock, spokeswoman for Naval Air Station Lemoore in California’s Central Valley, said Wednesday. A military helicopter searched for the pilot.

The U.S. Naval Air Forces shared the news over Twitter on Thursday:

The crash sent dark smoke billowing in the air, said Aaron Cassell, who was working at his family’s Panamint Springs Resort about 10 miles (16 kilometers) away and was the first to report the crash to park dispatch.

“I just saw a black mushroom cloud go up,” Cassell told The Associated Press. “Typically you don’t see a mushroom cloud in the desert.”

Ambulances were sent to the crash site near Father Crowley Overlook, but it wasn’t clear if anyone was transported for further medical treatment, said park spokesman Patrick Taylor. He said initial reports were that seven park visitors had minor injuries.

The lookout point about 160 miles (257 kilometers) north of Los Angeles is popular with photographers and aviation buffs who gawk at jets flying training missions in the steep, narrow canyon.

U.S. and foreign militaries train pilots and test jets in the gorge officially called Rainbow Canyon near the park’s western entrance.

Training flights are almost a daily feature with jets screaming below the rim of the canyon and passing so close viewers can see the pilots’ facial expressions.

Cassell said he heard jets roaring through the area and then saw the cloud of smoke.

“It looked like a bomb,” Cassell said. “To me that speaks of a very violent impact.”

A jet that was following the downed craft pulled up and began circling the area, Cassell said. He didn’t see any parachute.

His father drove up to the area after the crash and saw a large black scorch mark and shattered parts of the jet scattered throughout the area between the parking lot and lookout, Cassell said. A nose cone from the jet was the size of a bowling ball and the rest of the debris was no larger than a ball cap.

The jet was from strike fighter squadron VFA-151 stationed at Lemoore. The squadron is part of an air group attached to the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis.

The Super Hornet is a twin-engine warplane designed to fly from either aircraft carriers or ground bases on both air-superiority and ground-attack missions.

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